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Tuesday, July 21, 2009
Worship Quote of the Week
Blaise Pascal, born in 1623 in Clermont, France, lived a short life of profound significance. From an early age, his insatiable thirst to learn could not be quenched. He early achieved fame as a mathematician, a scientist, a physicist and a philosopher. Among his inventions were the calculator, the hydraulic press and the syringe. At the age of 31, he experienced a mystical encounter with the living God after which he left his studies behind to pursue theological wisdom and understanding. He died of stomach cancer before finishing his most famous and celebrated theological work, The Pensees. After his untimely death at the age of 39, his servant found a parchment sewn into the lining of his coat with an inscription describing his encounter with God. It follows:

In the year of grace, 1654, on Monday, 23rd of November, Feast of St Clement, Pope and Martyr, and others in the Martyrology. Vigil of St Chrysogonus, Martyr, and others.

From about half past ten in the evening until about half past twelve.

Fire!

God of Abraham, God of Isaac, God of Jacob,
Not of the philosophers and scholars.
Certitude. Certitude. Feeling. Joy. Peace.
God of Jesus Christ.
"Thy God and my God."
Forgetfulness of the world and of everything, except God.
He is to be found only in the ways taught in the Gospel.
Greatness of the Human Soul.

"Righteous Father, the world hath not known Thee,
But I have known Thee."

Joy, joy, joy, tears of joy.
I have separated myself from Him.
"They have forsaken Me, the fountain of living waters."
"My God, wilt Thou leave me?"
Let me not be separated from Him eternally.

"This is eternal life, That they might know Thee, the only true God,
And Jesus Christ, whom Thou hast sent."

Jesus Christ.
Jesus Christ.

I have separated myself from Him:
I have fled from Him,
denied Him,
crucified Him.
Let me never be separated from Him.
We keep hold of Him only by the ways taught in the Gospel.
Renunciation, total and sweet.
Total submission to Jesus Christ and to my director.
Eternally in joy for a day's training on earth.
"I will not forget thy words."

Amen.


Ever think of sowing something like this in the lining of one of your jackets? I'm considering it. ;0)

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posted by John David Walt | at 7/21/2009 10:19:00 AM

 

4 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

The work you refer to is called the 'Pensées' ('Thoughts'). One of my favourite quotes from this talks about 'the heart has its reasons that reason does not know'... ('le coeur a ses raisons que la raison ne connaît point.')

Sewing our testimony in a garment may not be the modern way of doing things... but it is interesting to think that Pascal did not broadcast this experience beforehand... yet was clearly profoundly changed by it.

Keep Singing

1:59 PM EDT  
Blogger sandra r. said...

It just seems so amazing to me that this came from the 17th century, and we are still so greatly encouraged by it.

I was intrigued by his expression, "Fire!"
and his proclaiming, "Jesus Christ/ Jesus Christ".

Word for the day is "certitude"... had to look that one up in a dictionary.
certitude - freedom from doubt, esp. in matters of faith or opinion; certainty.

I wonder if the parchment was sewn in the part of his jacket that would be over his heart...

Hmm...

1:42 AM EDT  
Blogger ziondreamer said...

Friend- thought of your "worship quote of the week". You might get some good ones from the National Worship Leaders Conference Tweeters. hashtag #nwlc09

We are hosting the conference this year and next year here at Resurrection.

11:58 AM EDT  
Blogger ziondreamer said...

Friend- thought of your "worship quote of the week". You might get some good ones from the National Worship Leaders Conference Tweeters. hashtag #nwlc09

We are hosting the conference this year and next year here at Resurrection.

11:59 AM EDT  

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